Why are batteries connected in both series & parallel? How does the battery bank capacity change as result?

Why are batteries connected in both series & parallel? How does the battery bank capacity change as result?

Batteries are connected in both series and parallel configuration to increase the capacity of the battery bank thereby increasing the duration for which back-up power can be provided to the loads by the bank. However, while doing so, it is important to ensure that the DC voltage of the Inverter matches the voltage of the battery bank being connected to it to avoid any damage to the battery bank and to ensure appropriate charging of the battery bank by the Inverter.

When batteries are connected in series, the voltage of the battery bank goes up and is equal to sum of the voltages of the individual batteries. For e.g. if 2 nos. of 12V (150Ah) batteries are connected in series, the voltage of the battery bank will be 24V (= 12V+12V) and this battery bank can be charged by an inverter having a DC voltage rating of 24V. By connecting the individual batteries in series, the energy that can be stored in the battery bank increases to 3600Wh (=24V*150Ah).

When batteries are connected in parallel, the voltage of the battery bank is the same as the voltage of the individual batteries, while the capacity of the battery bank doubles. Please note that only batteries having the same voltage rating should be connected in parallel to ensure uniform charging/discharging of the batteries and to prevent damage to/maximize life of the individual batteries. For e.g. if 2 nos. of 12V (150Ah) batteries are connected in parallel, the voltage of the battery bank will be 12V and this battery bank can be charged by an inverter having a DC voltage rating of 12V. By connecting the individual batteries in parallel, the energy that can be stored in the battery bank increases to 3600Wh (=12V*(2*150)Ah).

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